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Practice Sharing - 28th October 2013

Guest speakers Rachel Cameron, Senior Co-ordinator Home Start Stirling and Caroline Nisbet, NHS Forth Valley Disability Team

What happened at the event?

The workshop consisted of three main parts:

  1. The first part of the meeting was practice sharing between FVLS and interpreters. We reiterated that preparation for the assignment is very important step and two interpreters gave examples on how they prepared for medical appointments.
  2. Rachel gave a Power-point presentation to introduce Home Start as an organisation, their field of work and ethics.
    Rachel reiterated the organization is open to families with at least one child under the age of 5 and would support families in many different aspects of life. Home Start always needs volunteers for family support, home visits and also interpreting. Many of their supported families are now of an ethnic minority background.
  3. Rachel also facilitated a Q&A session and engaged with interpreters to better understand the cultural background and specifics in communicating with speakers of foreign languages.
    For example, it was mentioned how there are practices in place where women can signal they might be experiencing some form of abuse – e.g. when submitting their urine sample they can use a red dot sticker on the sample to signal this. However, upon checking with Forth Valley NHS Women&Children’s Services, it transpired that this practice has now been abandoned due to lack of uptake and replaced by trained midwifes who would be supporting the women from the very beginning of the pregnancy.

Who Came?

11 interpreters and 1 member of staff attended. Many more could not make it to the events, but asked to be kept up to date with developments by email.
Participants included men and women and a wide range of ethnicities and faith groups. Participants were of varied age profiles.

What did people who took part say about the event?

Participants fed back that they valued being able to share practice and to be able to seek claficiation on any issues.

Did people feel better informed and equipped to conduct interpreting sessions?

Overwhelmingly people did feel this had been achieved. Most of the participants said that they felt better informed and more knowledgeable and confident about the work. They all took on board that they need to keep themselves updated with the linguistic and societal developments both here and in their home countries and prepare well for an interpreting assignment.


Introduction to Interpreting context - 11th Aug 2013

What happened at the event?

The workshop consisted of two main parts:

  1. Powerpoint presentation session to introduce participants to the specifics of community interpreting; rights, responsibilities and practicalities of interpreting; agency knowledge, scenarios etc.
  2. This was followed by a group session with interpreters and coordinator working through different interpreting phrases and contexts (such as housing association, welfare, various medical terms) and sharing experience in working in this field.
    Participants took part in the role plays and group discussions. The group watched 3 videos highlighting the issues surrounding interpreting situations and examples of good and bad practice.

Who Came?

6 interpreters and 1 member of staff attended. Many more could not make it to the events, but asked to be kept up to date with developments by email.
Participants included men and women and a wide range of ethnicities and faith groups. Participants were of varied age profiles.

What did people who took part say about the event?

Participants fed back that they valued:

Did people feel better informed and equipped to conduct interpreting sessions?

Overwhelmingly people did feel this had been achieved. Most of the participants said that they felt better informed and more knowledgeable and confident about the work. They all took on board that they need to keep themselves updated with the linguistic and societal developments both here and in their home countries and prepare well for an interpreting assignment.

Housing Benefit changes in the Interpreting context held 9th May 2013, Falkirk

The workshop consisted of four main parts:

  1. A Powepoint presentation session to introduce participants to changes to the Housing and Welfare benefits. A handout with detailed description of changes and how it will affect claimants was distributed and disseminated.
  2. This was followed by a Group exercise in which the participants discussed certain phrases and concepts from the Housing field (benefit cap, universal credit, working tax credit, bedroom tax etc) and tried to find the best equivalents and meaning of these.
    An in-depth summary of all the recent welfare changes was distributed and disseminated and participants took all the material with them. The group shared their experiences and ideas in respect to the intepreting sessions in Housing context.
  3. A local Mandarin interpreter, held a presentation ‘Spotlight on China’ and highlighted cultural and linguistic specifics and background.
  4. General practice sharing session with the trainer.

Group HugIntroduction to Interpreting - held 27th March 2013 Falkirk

This workshop also consisted of four main parts:

  1. A Powepoint presentation session to introduce participants to the Code of Conduct, Rights and Responsibilities of Interpreters. The trainer provided both theoretical principles and practical examples of good and bad practice and covered various scenarios.
  2. This was followed by a session by Linda Harrison and Tricia Davenport of Bilingual and Traveler Support Service from the Falkirk Council. Linda and Tricia held a short presentation on Education Services of the Council, their work with ME children and their families. They explained how they use interpreters and provided examples of good and bad practice when interpreting in schools/nurseries/during home visits etc. Linda and Tricia facilitated also a Q∓A session, where they answered any queries and questions that the interpreters put forward. They have also distributed a copy of Education brochures and enrolment forms.
  3. A local Polish-English interpreter, with over 15 years of experience in interpreting and translating held a presentation ‘A day in the life of an Interpreter’, followed by Q& A session; she covered various interpreting contexts such as NHS, Housing, and Schools.
  4. Videos of interpreting situations were shown and discussed in the group.

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